HMS DAEDALUS
HERITAGE 

Conservation measures & Daedalus Development Strategy and the Future


 
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Planning in Gosport/Daedalus. Source: Major Development Sites in Gosport (3.3 Development Plans)
 
 
SITE DESCRIPTION 
The site comprises of a former air station of 100 acres, containing over a million square feet of buildings, an airfield of 400 acres with three multi-directional runaways, and a slipway into the Solent. The buildings, which include large hangars, accommodation blocks, and a Wardroom overlooking the Solent, are mostly in very good condition and largely fall within the Borough of Gosport. The airfield, most of which lies in the Borough of Fareham, contains a comprehensive perimeter track system with hangars, control tower, airfield management system, fuel farm and support services.
Heritage Value 
HMS Daedalus is the most complete surviving example of a seaplane base in Britain. In particular, the range of domestic architecture, reflecting the changing requirements of aviation communities is regarded as better than any other military airbase in the country. The group of aircraft hangars around the slipway constructed at the beginning of the First World War are  among the most significant of their period.

Other excellent examples of RAF stations include those at Duxford and Bicester, however the site at HMS Daedalus is the most complete surviving example of a seaplane base in Britain. In particular, the range of domestic architecture, reflecting the changing requirements of naval aviation is regarded as better than any other military aviation establishment in the country.

The measures available for conserving the site include listing individual buildings and the creation of a Conservation Area. Both of these measures have been pursued. English Heritage have completed a survey of the site as part of the national thematic survey of airfields and have indicated that the local authorities will be consulted on their recommendations with any listing originally proposed for being announced in summer 2000. Current expectations are that the important buildings already referred to in the Daedalus Development Strategy and possibly others are likely to be listed.

Comparably important naval aviation sites in the area include the establishment on Calshot Spit. In March 1913 the first of a number of Royal Naval air Stations was established on Calshot Spit and a unique wooden hangar was erected which still stands, with the name of the Sopwith Hangar.  The first seaplane based at the station was the Sopwith Bat and the then Station Commander gave Sir Winston Churchill his first aeroplane flight in a Sopwith from Calshot. During the first World War the Air Station was developed with the erection of other hangars including the present Schneider and Sunderland together with other buildings and a narrow gauge railway, where one of its steam engines is still in use on the Tallylyn Railway in Wales. (Ref: History Calshot - develop a Heritage Plan for the Calshot Site and Visitor Strategy Visitor Centre and Centre Reception)

CONSERVATION MEASURES 
A range of measures have been pout in place over the past 10 years or so, taking into account the natural and cultural heritage and through exploring opportunities for multi-use land planning including recreational and commercial use.
 
Daedalus Conservation Area
The prime purpose for Conservation Area status is to preserve and/or enhance the special character of an area.

Conservation Areas: Gosport Borough Council.

In 1999 Gosport Borough Council proposed the designation of the built up area of the former HMS Daedalus establishment, the built up area, as a Conservation Area under the provisions of the 1990 Planning (listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act.

The Hampshire County Council had earlier expressed concern that the Daedalus site could be marketed without any protection for this historic area and its buildings. Following a joint officer inspection of the site and written support from the County Council, Gosport Borough Council, which had also expressed similar concerns at a meeting of its Planning Committee on 8 November 1999 formally designated part of the site a Conservation Area. The plan attached in the Gosport Borough Council Planning and Transportation Committee Report (DO/MCE/L4(C))(8 November 1999) and the Hampshire County Council Defence Heritage and Tourism Panel Report 30 November 1999 by the Director of Property, Business and Regulatory Services indicates the extent of the Conservation Area (HCC, 1999).

Conservation Area - Gosport Borough Council

The Borough Council has a duty to identify those areas within the Borough that have a 'Special' Architectural or Historic Character that it wishes to preserve or enhance and to designate them as Conservation Areas. Such areas will normally be based on the older areas of the town and may well contain Listed Buildings within their boundaries. Groups of buildings, trees, open space and water features contribute to this special character. The Borough Council has designated sixteen Conservation Areas up to 2000 and further designations may follow as deemed appropriate.

Conservation Area implementation

The Borough Council has the principal responsibility to ensure that this policy is implemented, but local residents also have an important role to play. The Borough Council is obliged under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Area) Act 1990 to prepare enhancement schemes for the whole of each Conservation Area and present them to a public meeting. The public have the opportunity to comment on the proposals and the Borough Council must have regard to these comments before adopting schemes.

The Borough Council has a duty to initiate action within the Conservation Areas. However, it is the interest, participation and involvement of the local residents that will determine the success of any Conservation Area.

Lee-on-the-Solent to Itchen Estuary SSSI
Lee-on-the-Solent to Itchen Estuary SSSI

Special Scientific Interest SSSI.
Type: Biological & Geological
National Grid Ref  SU520031

Foreshore and Daedalus slipway within Lee-on-the-Solent to Itchen Estuary Site of Special Scientific Interest. Avoid disturbing birds, particularly in Winter. Info: English Nature (01703 283944).

Geology at Lee-on-the-Solent References:
Burton, L.A & Peacy, B.E. 1997 The Archive Photograph Series, Lee-on-the- Solent. The Chalford Publishing Company: 1- 128.
Edwards, R.A. & Freshney, E.C.1987 Geology of the country around Southampton. Memoir of the British Geological Survey Sheet 315 (England and Wales). English Nature 1992 Hampshire, Lee-on-the-Solent to Itchen Estuary Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI). English Nature, Lyndhurst, Hampshire: 2-3.
Kemp, D.J. 1985 The Selsey Division (Bracklesham Group) at Lee-on-the-Solent, Gosport, (Hants). Tertiary Research 7(2): 35-44.
Kemp, D.J., King, A, King, C. & Quayle.W.J.1979 Stratigraphy and Biota of the Elmore Formation (Huntingbridge Division, Bracklesham Group) Lee-on-the-Solent, Hampshire. Tertiary Research 2(2): 93-103
 

Some species of plants and animals listed on the citation may be also subject to special protection under Part I of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, or under the Habitats Regulations 1994. It is an offence under Section 28 P of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as incorporated by the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000), without reasonable excuse, intentionally or recklessly to destroy or damage any of the flora, fauna, or geological or physiographical features by reason of which land is of special interest, or intentionally or recklessly to disturb any of those fauna. A person found guilty of any such offence may be liable on summary conviction to a fine not exceeding £20,000 or on conviction on indictment to a fine.

Notification as an SSSI confers no right of entry to any land, without the permission of the landowner. The following citations detail the 'features of interest' for which Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs) have been notified. Each citation shows details of location, site size and the date of notification. They also describe the general reasons for notification and the habitats and flora and fauna that are found at the site.

The Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000 The Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000 (CROW) strengthens the powers of English Nature and the Countryside Council for Wales to ensure the better protection and management of SSSIs. The CROW Act improves the legislation for protecting and managing SSSIs so that: English Nature can vary existing SSSIs to take account of natural changes or new information; Public bodies have a duty to further the conservation and enhancement of SSSIs; neglected or mis-managed sites can be brought into favourable management.
 

Special Protection Area
Special Protection Area
Nearby to Daedalus
 
Solent Maritime Special Area of Conservation - Introduction

In 1995, much of the Solent's Coastline was identified as a possible Special Area of Conservation (SAC) under the EU Habitats Directive, and includes as one of the 15 component SSSIs: Lee-on-the-Solent to Itchen Estuary. This area is being considered as a candidate Special Area of Conservation (SAC) because it contains habitat types and/or species, which are rare or threatened within a European context. The SSSI citation describes the special interests for which the site was notified in the British context. [NB Not for marine interests below mean low water mark]. The interests for which the site was selected as SSSI may differ from the interests selected in a European context.

See Map of the Solent Forum

East Solent Shoreline Coastal Management Plan
East Solent Shoreline Coastal Management Plan.
Stage One Volume One - The open Coast

Report EX3441 June 1997
Figure 30 -  Planning policies and land allocations – Portsmouth Harbour entrance to River Hamble

PLANNING POLICIES
DAEDALUS WORKING GROUP: The Mayor (ex-officio); Chairman of the Policy and Resources Committee (Councillor Edgar) (ex-officio), Councillors Mrs Bloodworth, Burgess, Farr, Hook, Kimber, Mrs Searle, Taylor and Train.(ref: Gosport Borough Council Committee Membership for the 2000/2001 Municipal Year)

The site is identified in both the adopted Fareham and Gosport Borough Local Plans as an operational MoD Establishment and therefore neither contain specific land use proposals for its reuse or redevelopment. However, the airfield is included within the defined strategic gap (Policy CY1 of the GBLP) which is intended to prevent the coalescence of adjoining settlements. The building complex is included within the existing urban area of Lee-on-the-Solent in which the principle of development is acceptable. The airfield is also identified as a potential area for minerals development in the deposit Hampshire Minerals and Waste Local Plan, which is yet to be confirmed following a PLI.

Defence heritage and tourism policy Hampshire County Council

The main problem is achieving a co-ordinated policy for responding to the massive demands and opportunities of Hampshire's defence heritage and to a slightly lesser extent industrial history.  These are areas where not only major independent museums operate, but also groups of enthusiasts whose enthusiasm is usually not matched by resources or in some cases by a sense of perspective. Trying to provide a more coherent countywide policy in these areas is an important priority.

Daedalus Development Strategy

The Local Authorities and the MoD have prepared a Development Strategy for the whole site. The Strategy will outline the key principles of reuse and redevelopment and on the appropriate mix of economic, housing, sports/leisure and other development. The 39ha southern section of the site was briefly on the market by the MOD through Hillier Parker but taken off in 2001 with only a few married quarters being sold.

In March 2000 the Hampshire County Structure Plan (Review) - CSP Review was adopted. The philosophy of the CSP Review to make best use of urban areas means that a number of important development opportunities in the area served by SHRT 1 are about to take place. These include: Former HMS Daedalus Mixed comprehensive development including up to 50,000 square metres business uses, retail units, major indoor sports facilities, 15,000 square metres for hangers or offices and 500 dwellings.

Hampshire Plans
Hampshire Structure Plan adopted in March 2000, covers the period 2001-2011.

The majority of the airfield of Daedalus falls under the control of Fareham Borough Council, the Borough Council has determined that the Fareham part of the Daedalus establishment will not be required to meet the current housing supply targets up to 2006. It is possible in the long term, post 2006, that part of the site could be developed for residential use. The existing built up area of the site, comprising 45 hectares, lies within Gosport. A development brief has been drawn up that has provision for a mixed use scheme comprising 40,000m2 business/office space, 2,500m2 retail and 5,250m2 for indoor sport and leisure facilities. in addition 14 hectares has been set aside for residential use.

 
Appropriate management guidelines for historic sites.
The marketing programme for the "built" sector, 38.81ha (95,9 acres) of the former HMS Daedalus has been extended to provide more time for expressions of interest to be submitted to the MoD's agents.  According to the Economic Prosperity Sub-Committee Item 5, 20 April 2000. The Economic Impact of the Defence Estate in Hampshire. Report of the Head of Economic Development). No indication has been given by MoD of the timetable for the marketing of the "non built" airfield sector, 161ha (398 acres), of the former naval air station at Daedalus.  A development strategy covering both sectors of the site has been agreed by Defence Estates, the County Council and both Borough Councils.
This would secure continued use of at least part of the airfield for aviation use for the foreseeable future consistent with  Hampshire County Structure Plan (Review) policies regarding the reuse of former MoD airfields.

Fieldwork on the Aviation Thematic Study is complete.

Phoenix Trust - example in Gosport fort of restored tourism and housing project. Phoenix trust is part of the Princes foundation. The DE (Annual report 1999) felt The Phoenix Trust was seen as a 'muscular' organization suited to take forward larger projects, and it was agreed that the MOD would continue to provide advance warning of potential candidate sites that might be of interest to the Trust and others.

Strategic Gap

The HMS Daedalus airfield is located within a Strategic Gap. the airfield is included within the defined strategic gap (Policy CY1 of the GBLP) which is intended to prevent the coalescence of adjoining settlements. There is, therefore, currently a  significant policy constraint against built development on this area  of land. The limitation of the preferred area for mineral working to the eastern part of the airfield would leave the western part available for continued airfield use.

Daedalus Development Strategy, 1997
Daedalus Development Strategy Partners - Gosport and Fareham Borough Councils and the Ministry of Defence

This report is an overview of the strategic aims of the Museums Service within the context of Hampshire County Council's Corporate Aims.

1.2   The twelve Action Points which were adopted for the period 1996-1998 are reviewed.  These have either been achieved, or good progress made in cases where the work is of a continuing nature.  In one case, the development of the Naval Armaments Museum at Priddy's Hard, Gosport, work has ceased for reasons outside of the control of the Recreation and Heritage Committee.

1.3   Thirteen Action Points are recommended for the period 1999-2000.  These support the Corporate Aims of Hampshire County Council and provide a balance between direct public service and access, development and care of the collections, local museums and countywide services.

6.11  Support the Defence Heritage policy

*     conserve the historic vessels owned by Hampshire County Council (M33, MTB71 and MTB331)
*     support the development of independent museums which contribute to the care of and public access to the defence heritage


Hampshire County Council Museums Panel Item 2. 9 February 1999. Museums Service Development Plan : 1999 Review and Revision. Report of the Director, County Museums Service. Contact: Stephen Locke, Ext 6300

What is the Daedalus Development Strategy?

As part of the preparations for disposal of the former HMS Daedalus property which was owned by the Ministry of Defence, the 'Daedalus Development Strategy' was prepared jointly by the County Council, Gosport and Fareham Borough Councils and the MOD, the County Council's Planning and Transportation Committee in September 1997 approved the strategy document. The strategy outlines the key principles of reuse and redevelopment and the appropriate mix of economic, housing, sports/leisure and other development.

Where can I see the Strategy?

The Development Strategy available from the Gosport Council’s Planning Department.

What are the aims of the Strategy?

Daedalus Development Strategy Partners - Gosport and Fareham Borough Councils and the Ministry of Defence

What is the Daedalus Development Strategy?

As part of the preparations for disposal of the former HMS Daedalus property which was owned by the Ministry of Defence, the 'Daedalus Development Strategy' was prepared jointly by the County Council, Gosport and Fareham Borough Councils and the MOD, the County Council's Planning and Transportation Committee in September 1997 approved the strategy document. The strategy outlines the key principles of reuse and redevelopment and the appropriate mix of economic, housing, sports/leisure and other development.

Where can I see the Strategy?

The Development Strategy available from the Gosport, Fareham and Hampshire Council Planning Departments.

What are the aims of the Strategy?

The broad aims are that the release of the site at Daedalus provides a key opportunity to meet local housing, employment and recreational needs without compromising existing gap and countryside policies.  The plan seeks to safeguard the character of the site and proposes the retention and reuse of historically important buildings.

The  strategy allows for a number of land use options for the site which could include employment uses, housing, recreation and leisure, aviation and mineral extraction.

How it was prepared?

The Daedalus Development Strategy was approved in Summer 1997, following public   consultation.

In 1995 Gosport Borough Council sought the County Council's co-operation in participating in a partnership with  the two Borough Councils and the Ministry of Defence to prepare a development and marketing strategy for the site. In April 1996 this Committee endorsed the   County Council's participation in preparing a strategy and resolved to appoint four Members to  represent the County Council on a Joint Members' Panel to consider issues associated with the
site.

It started life in November 1995 Gosport Borough Council sought  the County Council's co-operation in participating in a partnership with the two Borough Councils and the MOD to prepare a development and marketing strategy for the HMS Daedalus site. On 15 April 1996 this Committee  resolved to continue the County Council's involvement with the preparation of  the draft Daedalus Development Strategy.  It is proposed by the other partners (Gosport and Fareham Borough Councils and the Ministry of Defence) that the draft document is published for the purposes of public consultation during August and September 1996. An Action Plan for the development strategy was first prepared.  Key points included:
 

(i)     11 officers' group meetings are envisaged;
(ii)    Member involvement is provided for through  a Joint Members' Panel and regular reporting to the County Council's, Fareham  Borough Council's and Gosport Borough Council's planning committees (the County Council was  previously  represented on a similar Members' Panel by Councillors Collett, Harrison, Leyland and Millard); and
(iii)   it hoped to publish a public consultation draft in July 1996 and to finalise the strategy by the end of that year.
 
Feasibility work for the Strategy
 
The feasibility work for the strategy showed that the built-up part of the site could accommodate up to 500 dwellings providing a  range of densities, including an element of affordable housing.  The strategy also proposes 53 units for an institutional residential use, eg a nursing home; 30,000-50,000 square metres of business development which could create up to 1,500 jobs, thereby making a significant contribution towards replacing jobs lost through the defence restructuring  programme;  2,000-3,000 square metres of retailing (in 200-300 square metre units);  an hotel and 3,000-7,000 square metres of indoor sports and leisure facilities. Public open space would be provided in accordance with the Gosport Borough Local Plan.

The following strategic land use and transportation objectives for the site have been suggested by officers  and acceptable to other participants:
 

(i)     to provide new local employment opportunities;
(ii)    to protect  and enhance the Stubbington/Fareham/Gosport strategic gap;
(iii)   to protect and allow for the extraction of the mineral deposit under the airfield;
(iv)   to maintain the potential for continued general aviation use of the airfield;
(v)    to protect and maintain the historical character and interest of the site, its buildings and other features;
(vi)   to assist in meeting Hampshire's housing needs;
(vii)  to provide, where appropriate, sports and leisure facilities of regional benefit and to enhance the range of local facilities;
(viii) to achieve sustainability by allocating new development such that the use of energy efficient transport is encouraged while overall travel demand is minimised and to contribute, where appropriate, to the enhancement and  improvement of the transportation network serving the site; and
(ix)   to assist in reducing the levels of out-commuting from the Gosport Peninsula. (ref: Hants CC, Planning and Transport Committee, 15 April 1996. Item 8)
 
The draft development strategy has been prepared to consider the reuse and redevelopment of this strategically important site now that the Ministry of Defence has declared it surplus to requirements and  will seek  to dispose  of the site as quickly as possible.  The document provides  an opportunity for local residents, businesses and organisations to comment on the future of the site. The document considers the built-up southern part of the site in the form of six planning zones with a variety of potential uses and combination of uses.  The main objective is to reuse the buildings of historic interest and other buildings, where suitable, to provide  housing, employment and  recreational opportunities, whilst protecting and enhancing the appearance of the site.  The draft development strategy envisages that the built-up part of  the site could accommodate  about 500 houses, 40,000-50,000 square metres  (63,000 square metres in total on  the whole  site) of  business space,  2,000-3,000 square metres retailing,  an hotel  and 4,000-9,500  square metres of indoor leisure/sports facilities, with  some four hectares of public open space. The draft development strategy sets out four options for the airfield part of the site.  It does not deal with matters of detail but sets out the suitable principal land  uses.  The options are broadly:
 
 (i)     retain the existing three runways;
 (ii)    retain the western runway as existing;
 (iii)   no airfield use; and
 (iv)    use for a specific occupier.


Consultation draft Development Strategy

The consultation draft Development Strategy set out four options for the airfield part of the site. These have been retained in the final version of the document  and  are broadly:

 
(i)     retain the existing three runways;
(ii)    retain the main (western) runway;
(iii)   no airfield use; and
(iv)    use for a specific occupier.


The main access to and from the site would be from  the northern part  through  Broom  Way  with  secondary  access provided from Gosport Road.

 
3.4     A new section on implementation has been added.  This provides a greater degree of guidance to a developer than in the earlier consultation draft.  It sets out  in a comprehensive way what  information the local planning authorities will expect to accompany a planning application. This section also sets out what contributions to infrastructure will be required and where opportunities for grant funding such as EU Konver exist.


            Prime objective.
 

3.4     The prime objective for the airfield is to retain and enhance the Strategic Gap with the majority of the existing buildings removed and possibly replaced by new buildings, primarily for employment purposes, adjacent to or within the main built-up part of the site.  The main access to and from the airfield would be from Broom Way with secondary access from Gosport Road.  It is intended to keep the strategy flexible so that a wide range of recreational uses could be acceptable.
 
3.5     The airfield is identified as a Preferred Area for sand and gravel extraction in the Deposit Hampshire Minerals and Waste Local Plan.  Changes to the Plan have been proposed to allow for continued general aviation and to take into account detailed survey evidence of the mineral deposit.  The issue of mineral extraction will have major consequences for the future of the site.  The Inspector's Report on  the public inquiry into objections to the Hampshire Minerals and Waste Local Plan is expected in September 1996  and therefore the document has been prepared to include the  possibility that mineral extraction will take place.
 
3.6     An Environmental Impact Assessment and a Traffic Impact Assessment will be required for  major development on the site.
 
3.7     A public consultation exercise was proposed for the summer period lasting until the end of September.
The Daedalus Development Strategy identified possible future development options for the airfield, including the possible relocation of some of the existing empty hangers on the eastern part of  the site  to a less  visually exposed area adjacent to the main existing building complex in the south. However, a key consideration  in the possible relocation of these buildings  is the  need to safeguard the underlying mineral deposits from development which may sterilise their potential for future extraction. The deepest  mineral reserves are located to the north of  the Gosport  Borough boundary.
The Daedalus Development Strategy was finally approved in Summer 1997 and is robust enough to provide guidance to any prospective developer.  It provides clear guidance  for the site whilst providing sufficient flexibility to cater for a number of scenarios on the airfield part of the site, which would include accommodating the activities of the Police and Coastguard. It also refers to the important and historic buildings (Hampshire County Council Planning and Transportation Committee Item 5, 8 September 1997. Daedalus Development Strategy. Report of the County Planning Officer and County Surveyor).
 
Gosport Borough Local Plan
 
The Gosport Borough Local Plan was adopted by the Council in April 1995. It sets out detailed policies and specific proposals for  the development and use of land, and should guide most day to day planning decisions.
Development Opportunities
"These land releases represent  the most significant  'brownfield' site redevelopment opportunities in Hampshire".

Adjoining the Solent, the former HMS Daedalus is one of the largest re-development sites in Hampshire and offers enormous potential for business development with sufficient space to allow flexibility for expansion. The site infrastructure is extensive and well maintained. The site comprises an airbase of 100 acres, containing over a million square feet of buildings, and an airfield of 400 acres with three multi-directional runaways. The buildings, which include large hangars, accommodation blocks, and a Wardroom overlooking the Solent, are mostly in very good condition and suited for conversion and re-use. There is also considerable potential for re-development. The airfield (most of which lies in the Borough of Fareham) contains a comprehensive perimeter track system with hangars, control tower, airfield management system, fuel farm and support services.

 
Development Opportunities

The release of surplus Ministry of Defence sites in the Borough combined with land owned by the Council and private sector will bring a total of some 400 acres to the market over coming months. This represents an unprecedented opportunity for development, investment and expansion. Much of this land lies on Gosport Waterfront with its associated opportunities for leisure, recreation and tourism. A major new business park is one possible development at the former HMS Daedalus air base in Lee-on-the-Solent. The scale of economic change in the Borough has been recognised by the urban regeneration agency, English Partnerships, and by the European Union through its KONVER programme which aids the diversification of former defence-dependent economies. To facilitate development and maximise the potential, Gosport Borough Council has joined force with the Ministry of Defence Estates Organisation, English Partnerships and Hampshire County Council to form the Gosport Regeneration Partnership.

 
Defence Estates have embarked on a range of new initiatives which include the comprehensive revision of the MOD Conservation Manual, following the production of 'The Care of Historic Buildings and Ancient Monuments - Guidelines for Government Departments and Agencies' by English Heritage (EH). A study into the cost-in-use of historic buildings has been started, which will address the question of whether the listing or scheduling of a building necessarily creates a need for additional expenditure.
Economic Strategic Sites, Business Parks & Industrial Sites
Business and the Economy Strategic Sites - Hampshire

Strategic sites in Hampshire as identified by Hampshire Economic Partnership and include Former HMS Daedalus, Lee on Solent as one of the 13 sites for Hampshire. Primary use: Mixed Use.

Business Parks and Industrial Sites - Hampshire

Former HMS Daedalus is listed as one of 9 Business Parks and Industrial Sites - Hampshire for primarily use - Office/Industrial (ref: Gosport Borough Council)

The document considers the built-up southern part of the site in the form of six planning zones with a variety of potential uses and combination of uses.  The main objective is to reuse the buildings of historic interest and other buildings, where suitable, to provide  housing, employment and  recreational opportunities, whilst protecting and enhancing the appearance of the site.  The draft development strategy envisages that the built-up part of  the site could accommodate  about 500 houses, 40,000-50,000 square metres  (63,000 square metres in total on  the whole  site) of  business space, 2,000-3,000 square metres retailing,  an hotel  and 4,000-9,500  square metres of indoor leisure/sports facilities, with some four hectares of public open space (Draft Strategic plan 1996).

South East Hampshire Transportation Strategy (SEHTS)
South East Hampshire Transportation Strategy  (SEHTS)
The South East Hampshire Transportation Strategy (SEHTS) which sets out a policy framework and objectives to deal with transport planning in the area for the next 15-20 years. Gosport Borough Council has sought the co-operation of the County Council (and Fareham Borough Council) in preparing a transport plan which would address current transport issues and assess the specific transport infrastructure needed to serve appropriate developments on the land to be released. Several studies have already been undertaken as part of the SEHTS, as well as the recent Millennium Plan, and an overall transport plan for the borough will be able to draw together the conclusions from these studies. Work  produced reports in September 1996.

HMS Daedalus, together with all other development  sites on the peninsula, will  be expected to contribute towards an overall transport strategy and this will be apportioned in relation to traffic generation and impact on the network.

Hampshire Minerals and Waste Local Plan - Deposit Plan
Hampshire Minerals and Waste  Local Plan -  Deposit Plan (1993).
The site is underlain with deposits of  gravel and was removed from the list of preferred extraction sites following the recommendations of the inspector at the 1995 Public Inquiry into the Hampshire Minerals and Waste Local Plan.

The plan identified a potential mineral yield of 5.4  million tonnes within  the whole HMS Daedalus airfield site  as originally  included in  the Deposit Plan. In 1995 the Ministry of Defence had a geological survey of the site undertaken, including boreholes and trial pits. Findings of the survey indicated that these are  that the sand and gravel content of the HMS Daedalus airfield site is significantly less than the previous estimate used in the Deposit Plan.  In particular, the content of the  reduced Preferred Area  is considerably less than the estimate of 2.6 million tonnes. In addition, much of the sand and gravel deposit is overlain by a thick layer of overburden which may render its working uneconomic.

The Deposit Plan, as amended by the Proposed Pre-Inquiry Changes (January 1995),  identified a requirement for preferred area provision of  12.97 million tonnes of sharp sand and gravel to be made in the Plan. This included an over-provision of 20 percent, as considered necessary. The preferred areas in the Deposit Plan were estimated to have a combined yield of  13.1 million tonnes of sharp sand and gravel expected to be available in the period to 2008 (i.e. the Plan period, to 2001, plus a seven year landbank period).
1995 proposed changes to the Hampshire Minerals and Waste Local Plan  - Deposit Plan (1993)
(i)     amendment of the boundary of Preferred Area 5 - HMS Daedalus to include the area of the southern runway (as indicated in Figure 8.2 - Scenario 3 Minimum Airfield in the KONVER Study report by Arup Economics and Planning);

(ii)    inclusion of an additional policy, following Policy 22, to say that in the event that  there is no continuation of aviation use of the western runway of the HMS Daedalus airfield, the area will be treated as being part of Preferred Area 5 for sand and gravel extraction; and

(iii)   inclusion of additional text following this additional policy to say that any sand and gravel extraction within the western runway area of the HMS Daedalus airfield will be subject to a substantial unworked margin of at least 100 metres width being maintained along the western side of the area.

(Ref: MINERALS POLICY PANEL 24 JULY 1995).
(Ref: HAMPSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL MINERALS POLICY PANEL  ITEM 2. 16 FEBRUARY 1995 HAMPSHIRE MINERALS AND WASTE LOCAL PLAN - PROPOSED PRE-INQUIRY CHANGES REPORT OF THE COUNTY PLANNING OFFICER)

Aviation Study Report of the County Planning Officer
Daedalus Development Strategy: Aviation Study Report of the County Planning Officer
The objective of the aviation study was to undertake a business appraisal for the airfield to enable the local authorities and the landowner to better understand the consequences  and costs of continued aviation use at Daedalus. The study assessed the commercial  viability under the following scenarios:
(i) use of the airfield for general  aviation purposes, including the Police and coastguard services, and the full potential of the hangers for either aviation or industrial/storage use (general aviation taken to mean all aeroplane and helicopter flying except that performed by the major airlines and the Armed Services, eg business flying, air taxis and aerial surveying); and (ii) as above but including commercial flying.
The viability of both of the above options was tested having regard to a one, two or three runway airfield and the possibility of the airfield being divided into two ownerships, eg the main  western runway being owned by the Police Authority and the remainder of the airfield being owned by another operator(s).

The study concluded that commercial air services at Daedalus are unlikely, given the good  transport  links enjoyed by Southampton  International Airport and the lack of infrastructure at Daedalus, the only  possible exception might be a low cost short haul commuter service. Opportunities in the general aviation market appear more attractive. A potential user survey indicated  interest from flying training organisations, aircraft sales companies, and aircraft maintenance companies. Interest however related to some of the buildings or land only, and not the site as a whole. The consultants consider that potential buyers may emerge once the site is  actually put on the market. To increase the chances of being commercially viable, as well as maximising the potential economic benefits, the site would have to attract business aviation traffic and aircraft maintenance and manufacturing organisations.
 

In regard to the  viability of the airfield  utilising one, two or three runways, the case for retaining two or three runways in a fully operational condition for the relatively infrequent occasions when crosswinds would require their use was not considered to be financially  sustainable. Therefore, only the single runway option was taken forward for further detailed consideration. Three options based on retaining the main western runway were assessed:
        (i)     single commercial operator with the whole of  the airfield site;
        (ii)    single commercial operator with the western half only; and
        (iii)   whole   airfield with split Police/commercial ownership.
The financial analysis indicated that only option (i) was sufficiently commercially attractive,  paying back after seven years, whereas the other two options would only pay back after 10 years. The consultants acknowledge, however, that if lower land values were assumed then the other two options may be more commercially attractive.  Nevertheless, from a purely commercial perspective the consultants recommend that the site be disposed of as a single entity.

(Ref: HCC, Planning and transportation Committee, July 1988)
 

Under the Konver programme, a feasibility study was undertaken by Arup Economics and Planning for Gosport and Fareham Borough Councils on the options available for the future use of the HMS Daedalus site at Stubbington/Lee-on-the-Solent. This concluded that a mixed use of the airfield site, involving continued use of one or two of the three runways for aviation and mineral extraction on the remainder of the site, would be feasible. Relevant extracts from the Konver study report by Arup Economics and Planning -  Executive Summary, include Section 6  : Aviation Issues and Section 8: Site Development Opportunities - Airfield. The findings of the Konver study report relating to  the future use of the airfield and the preferred area for mineral extraction have now been considered by both Borough Councils.
Study  report by  Arup Economics  and Planning "optimum airfield' scenario identified in the Konver Study  report by  Arup Economics  and Planning  (see Appendix 1 to the report).  This option involves the retention of both the western and southern runways, with only the eastern  runway  being  removed  for  sand  and  gravel extraction.  This was supported by Gosport Borough Council, which said it would withdraw its objection to Preferred Area 5 if  the boundary of  the site  was amended  in this  way. Fareham Borough Council has maintained its outright objection to mineral working on any part of the site.
The KONVER Study report also included a 'minimum airfield' scenario, involving  retention of only the main, western runway. The report said about this option:
"8.10   In order to retain an operational airfield on the site there is a minimum area required for runway(s) hangars and support facilities. This would involve the retention of the main runway (05/23) and hangars to the north-west of the site. This scenario would result in some narrowing of the buffer between Stubbington and any area of mineral extraction on the eastern part of the airfield, although the strategic gap and  mineral reserves would still be safeguarded. However, this scenario results  in  a smaller aerodrome of approximately 55 hectares or 28 percent of the HMS Daedalus area.  This  would limit the scope of services available from the site including the loss of the helicopter manoeuvring area.  Whilst this is workable, limitations on the range of services available from HMS Daedalus  may make  it less feasible for continued military use."
Paragraph 8.14 of the KONVER Study report is relevant to this issue:
"8.14   Many General  Aviation airfields  exhibit  marginal financial  performance, breaking even but not generating commercially attractive rates of return for their operators. In some cases, operators supplement airport income with other more lucrative aviation activities such as aircraft  servicing and sales.  It is not possible to derive likely future costs in civilian use from Royal Navy accounts, nor within the scope of this study to  forecast  the profitability of  HMS Daedalus. On the basis of experience at other aerodromes, however, aviation use might  not generate surpluses sufficient to prompt operators to place a high purchase value on the site."

Ref: MINERALS POLICY PANEL 24 JULY 1995

Conservation and Heritage Funding
Millennium Scheme

The Renaissance of Portsmouth Harbour Millennium Scheme and Related Projects. Together, Gosport Borough Council, Portsmouth City Council, Portsmouth Historic Dockyard and the Portsmouth South East Hampshire Partnership, have been awarded a £38 million grant from the Millennium Commission to create an international maritime heritage arena.  The £84 million ‘Renaissance of Portsmouth Harbour’ project is one of twelve landmark schemes across the UK selected by the Commission to mark the new Millennium. The scheme will attract an extra 1.64 million visitors each year and create 3,500 new jobs.  It will act as a catalyst for over £300 million of investment in the local economy. "a landmark Millennium Project. One of 12 landmark projects around Britain that will provide a lasting memorial to celebrate the Millennium"

Opportunities from the Heritage Lottery Fund and European Union funding.

In the case of the Hovercraft proposal, the study acknowledges that the establishment of new museums/visitor attractions is a low priority for all the major funding agencies. The Study's heavy reliance on money from the Heritage Lottery Fund is therefore unrealistic.

Funding: the partnership would add support and credibility in promoting  package bids  with other funding partners to invest in site infrastructure, for example English Partnerships and EU KONVER  II. (HAMPSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL. PLANNING AND TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE ITEM 8. 15 APRIL 1996)

County Council part financed the Hovercraft Trust eg £5,000 grant. The feasibility study is a lengthy report which was part funded by the County Council (£2,000), along with Fareham and Gosport Borough Councils (£1,000 each) and the South East Museum Service (£2,000).

At their meeting on 10 December 1998 the Defence Heritage and Tourism Panel reviewed the history of financial support to the Southampton Hall of Aviation and agreed that in view of the importance of this museum (especially its collections) to the defence heritage and tourism policy of Hampshire County Council, they would provide revenue support of £15,000 p.a. towards the curation of the collection. (ref)

Historic Building Grants

Eligibility for Grant Assistance. Consideration of grant aid may be given to:

- 'Listed' Buildings
- Buildings on the 'Local List'
- Buildings within Conservation Areas
- Buildings of outstanding Townscape value
- Traditional shopfronts to historic buildings
- Historic gardens (those included on the register of Historic Gardens)
- Where the property forms part of a group of historic buildings

(In this latter case, consideration would be encouraged to an application relating to the whole group).

AT A MEETING of the HAMPSHIRE POLICE AUTHORITY held at The Castle,
Winchester on Tuesday 18 July, 2000
That a new capital budget of £677,000 in 2000/01 be agreed, to be financed by the slippage to future years of existing Capital Programme Schemes relating to HMS Daedalus and Land at the Isle of Wight.

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL ROADS AND DEVELOPMENT SUB-COMMITTEE ITEM 16 9 DECEMBER 1996 CONSERVATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENTS FUND REPORT OF THE COUNTY PLANNING OFFICER

The purpose of this report is to advise the Sub-Committee of conservation grants offered under my delegated powers, and to seek approval for grants to be given for historic buildings and grants over £5,000 for other projects. Appendix II: contains grants for Members to approve under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990; Fees Paid 22.10.96 to 9.12.96 HMS Daedalus 1,120.00


 
Konver Programme (European Community - Structural Funds - Community Initiative)

 
The Konver programme is a European Structural Funds Community Initiative aimed at accelerating the diversification of economic activities in regions heavily dependent on the defence sector. Konver I, in 1993/4 attracted £1.1m for Hampshire projects.  The Konver II programme was announced in 1995 for funding to December 1997. There have been two previous calls for bids under the second Konver programme under which Hampshire has already received funding during 1996/97. The first call under Konver II resulted in £956,000 worth of projects being awarded funding over a three year period. The second call resulted in £1,164,000 worth of funding for Hampshire projects. Konvers II - measure 3 - Daedalus £50,000.
The Future
THE FUTURE
In House of Commons Hansard Written Answers (29 Jan 2001 : Column: 64W)
Mr. Viggers: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will make a statement on the future of the Daedalus site at Lee-on-the-Solent. [147084]

Dr. Moonie [holding answer 25 January 2001]: The Strategy for the defence estate launched in June last year set out our intention to identify the core sites on which we would seek to focus different activities in the longer term. A study is now in progress to this effect.

The site has remained vacant and surplus and it was only in October 1999 that the Ministry of Defence began actively marketing the built part of the establishment. However this was taken off the market in early 2001 pending the review by the MOD on possible use of the site by the three services.

(Ref: Hampshire County Council. Defence Heritage and Tourism Panel. Item. 30 November 1999. HMS Daedalus, Lee-on-the-Solent. Report by the Director of Property, Business and Regulatory Services)

Along with other major Defence sites not yet sold, the former HMS Daedalus is being considered within this study. While it is still at an early stage and not likely to report for some time, we are looking to form an early view of the implications for the Daedalus site, if any, to avoid further uncertainty or delay. We hope to do this by the end of March and will keep the local authorities concerned informed of the position. (Ref Jan 2001)

Planning for the future
OTHER PLANNING IDEAS
Police airfield acquisition proposal

The Home Office, on behalf of the Police Authority, has made an application to
the Ministry of Defence to purchase the main western runway to continue its operations.   The decision of  the Ministry of Defence is still awaited. (1998)
 

Global Information network - cables

Gosport Borough Council is considering plans to transform the former HMS Daedalus naval air station at Lee-on-the-Solent into the UK centre for a global information network linked by undersea cables. 30-Sep-99 Daedalus is the chosen site for the UK landfall of Project Oxygen, the trans-global optic fibre network. Combined with the close proximity of a satellite teleport in Fareham, this site offers considerable potential for telecommunications, e-commerce or high-tech businesses seeking high capacity bandwidth communications infrastructure.
 

Horseracing racecourse

The British Horseracing Board is considering plans to develop a new racecourse at the former HMS Daedalus site in Lee-on-the-Solent. 27-Mar-00. From an original list of eight, the British Horseracing Board whittled the number down to four and 04 April, 2000 announced the successful applicants Pembrey and Fairlop, the losers being Lee-on-Solent and Newcastle.

HGP Architects have produced a concept masterplan for the HMS Daedalus unique 200 hectare site, which includes the retention of the majority of the site as an international standard horse racecourse, with the existing operational airfield, and telecommunications park. (see ref)



HGP Greentree Allchurch Evans Ltd.
Furzehall Farm, Wickham Rd, Fareham, Hampshire PO16 7 JH


GILMORE HANKEY KIRKE Architects, Planners and Conservation Specialists GHK prepared a development plan for disposal of a redundant Ministry of Defence 500 acre airfield beside the Solent. The site provided opportunities for a mixed use sea front development, a hotel, quality housing, large industrial uses, the conservation of historic buildings for small scale businesses and recreation uses within a strategic gap.
Hovercraft Museum Feasibility study
The Study assumes early on that the only way to secure the future care of, and access to, the collection is through the establishment of a new museum.  It does not explore cheaper alternatives to a museum which could conserve the most significant parts of the collection and allow public access to the collection via open days, IT, educational events and so on.  This type of approach would fulfill the Trust's aim of allowing public access without the burden of large fixed overheads and operation costs associated with traditional museums.
 
In a feasibility study for a hovercraft museum at Daedalus, it was determined that in the first five years the Museum could attract 15- 20,000 visitors a   year from Open Days and events.  By year 6 the Museum, could attract 35 -40,000 visitors a year. In the early years the operating costs are identified as £60,000 per annum. The Study suggests a grant could be found towards the salary costs (although it does not say where the grant could come from) with the rest of the costs being met by events, open days, filming rights and office/workshop rental. The need for start-up funding of £100,000 is highlighted to ensure that the Trust can be established on a proper professional footing from the beginning.  This, the Study suggests, could come from grants, donations by covenant, a share issue and legacies.
The Trust has had a couple of Open Weekends, which have brought in some 20,000 visitors and raised much needed finances. Like us they are run by Trustees, supported by 'Friends' of the Museum, and have very recently appointed their first paid employee, but only have one year security of tenure on an MoD (expensive) lease.
All these events proved tremendously popular with the summer weekend event achieving visitor numbers of 4,000 and the late October event (the weekend after half term) achieved a staggering 3,000 visitors. Hovershow '99 also surpassed all expectations, and the Trust hopes to repeat this success with Hovershow 2001 in May.
 How realistic are the projected visitor figures of 35 - 40,000 a year by year 6?  Many existing museums in Hampshire do not achieve this many visitors now and a significant number are struggling to survive. In addition, as the Study admits, the preferred site is 'out on a limb' and this will further impact on visitor numbers along with the 'museum fatigue' which is likely to occur with all the other museums are have open or are due to open in the near future in the Portsmouth Harbour area.

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